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The other day on the news I saw a story on a company called what3words that I found fascinating. To make a long story short - (check out their site for more details), they have come up with a way to name every square 3m of the planet using 3 word, simple but unique addresses in multiple languages. As with most great ideas, it's an extremely simple mapping between the 3 word address and GPS coordinates. For example, here's the w3w address for Mount Assiniboine: . For anyone who travels regularly off the grid, this is a fantastic new and intuitive way to give very precise coordinates in trip reports etc. Instead of handing out meaningless GPS coordinates which are difficult to translate into a real location, give out the three word address and you're good to go! I've added a field for this address in the map section of my trip reports.

Mount Cautley (Cautley Traverse)

I woke up on Sunday, September 25 2016 in the Lake Magog Campground and poked my head out of my tent only to be immediately disappointed. This was supposed to be the day of my long-awaited Mount Cautley Traverse - 4 new peaks in one stretch - all located along the same, fairly easy ridge and all with stunning views over the Mount Assiniboine area, including of course, the mighty Matterhorn of the Rockies.

Sunburst Peak (Goat's Tower)

Sunburst Peak has always interested me since first laying eyes on it in 2008, simply because it doesn't look nearly as easy as its reputation implies. There isn't a ton of trip reports available, but whatever is out there certainly doesn't make this objective sound very difficult - despite the appearance of impenetrable cliffs leading up to it's summit.

Sunshine Meadows - Mount Assiniboine

Ever since I first backpacked into the Mount Assiniboine area in early September 2008 from Mount Shark, I've wanted to go back in prime larch season - sometime in the last two weeks of September.  In 2015 I thought I'd be going back and for some reason or another it didn't pan out. In 2016 I was absolutely determined to make the hike and scramble trip work out.

Pharaoh Peak, Greater

As I watched the giant snow flakes fall gently and silently all around me and settle onto the yellow and red fall foliage before slowly starting to melt, I was struck by a thought that has hit me square between the eyes more than once while solo trekking on various trails and routes through the backcountry of my beloved Canadian Rockies. The beauty that I'd experienced on this long and tiring day - and many long and tiring days before it - was not there for my benefit. It was simply there.

Monarch, The

On Friday, August 19th I was joined by the indefatigable Phil Richards and Wietse Bylsma for another longish day trip in the Canadian Rockies. After two previous off-trail adventures to Breaker and Molar, Phil and I decided that it was time for a mostly on-trail objective. We settled on The Monarch, located between Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park and Kootenay National Park in British Columbia.

Molar Mountain

There are some mountains that really stir my gut when I think about doing them. For some reason Molar Mountain has been one such peak ever since I first saw a trip report and the corresponding stunning photographs from Andrew Nugara back in 2007. Without a doubt this is a top favorite scramble for me and worth every ounce of suffering that it's summit might entail.

Breaker Mountain (Capricorn Lake)

A wonderful off-trail scramble to a rarely visited and rarely seen area of Banff National Park, hidden high above Mistaya Lake and nestled between peaks on the Great Divide that runs between Alberta and BC. The Capricorn Lake area is a magical place of rushing streams, brilliantly colored lakes and soaring snow and ice covered mountains.

Woodland Caribou Provincial Park 2016 - Onnie Lake Entry

A 16 day father / son wilderness canoe trip into the heart of Woodland Caribou Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada. We traveled around 140km in two loops from Onnie Lake through Glenn, Haven and Mexican Hat and then Telescope, Hatchet, Douglas and back to Onnie Lake. For the first 12 days we were just with the two of us. The last 4 days we joined up with a group of friends to finish our adventure in good company.

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